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Publications and Reports: 1985

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Typification of mushroom names (The Regular Column).

Every mushroom, it turns out, wasn't named by the Supreme Being (The Regular Column).

Names Do Matter (The Regular Column).

In which assistance is rendered to a zoo with a mushroom eating bear (The Regular Column).

 

  • Lorelei Norvell. 1985.
    Typification of mushroom names (The Regular Column). Mushroom, The Journal 3(4): 13-15.
    CONTENTS: (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1985.
    Every mushroom, it turns out, wasn't named by the Supreme Being (The Regular Column). Mushroom, The Journal 3(3): 13-14.
    CONTENTS: An explanation of why the first name given to a mushroom may not be the final one. "Occasionally [our hero] finds that one type collection contains, in fact, two different species. Or he may discover that non-type collections have been mislabeled and are, in reality, "new" species that he -- fortuitously -- must describe and name." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
    -- Cited in Morel Tales: the Culture of Mushrooming (Fine 1998)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1985.
    Names Do Matter (The Regular Column). Mushroom, The Journal 3(2): 15-16.
    CONTENTS: An introduction to the twists and turns one encounters in Latin nomenclature. "But back to the entertaining, nomenclatural side of taxonomy. Some time a few centuries after people realized our friend Sam could be better identified as Sam Smithson, they began to sense that what worked for humans should work for other natural things as well. In the 18th century a fellow who came to be called Linnaeus devised the system of binomial nomenclature." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1985.
    In which assistance is rendered to a zoo with a mushroom eating bear (The Regular Column). Mushroom, The Journal 3(1): 22-23.
    CONTENTS: An encounter with a woozy European brown bear, array of obscure mushrooms, and a zookeeper. "‘There isn't any edibility information on Gymnopilus bellulus, but some in that genus have a psychoactive effect on humans. How is the bear doing, anyway?' ‘Oh, she's just fine. She's not giving us any trouble at all.' Even in the flush of success, I sensed something amiss. After all, identification in and of itself seldom effects a miraculous cure…"
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Last updated on October 13, 2003