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A study on the effects of harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon.

The herbarium and how it breeds (The Regular Column).

 

  • LL Norvell. 1991.
    A study on the effects of harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon. Abstract in MSA Newsletter 42(l): 29.
    ABSTRACT: The choice edible Cantharellus cibarius, ectomycorrhizal with various forest trees, is an economically significant secondary forest product. In 1986 the Oregon Mycological Society (helped by the USDA Forest Service) initiated a ten-year study on whether or not chanterelle harvesting would adversely affect productivity or the growth of the mycorrhizal partners. Ten study plots were established in a 100-year old hemlock-Douglas fir stand in the buffer zone of Mt Hood's Bull Run watershed. Since 1986, new chanterelles have been flagged by numbered skewers and mapped by triangulation with the dimensions of each fruiting body recorded every two weeks through the fruiting season. Since 1989 six of the ten plots have been harvested with chanterelles removed by cutting (3 plots) or pulling (3 plots). Four plots (in which no chanterelle removal is permitted) serve as controls. Three years of harvesting data indicate that picking chanterelles does not have an adverse impact on subsequent chanterelle productivity over the short term. Additional observations suggest that canopy closure, annual mean temperature, precipitation, and the presence of coarse woody debris may be more significant in the productivity of a given chanterelle site. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)]
    -- Cited in Mycology in Sustainable Development: Expanding Concepts, Vanishing Borders (1996, Redhead chapter)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1991.
    The herbarium and how it breeds (The Regular Column). Mushroom, The Journal 10(l): 15-17.
    CONTENTS: A light-hearted but educational look at curation, involving dried mushrooms, collection cabinets, mothballs, and herbarium beetles. Accompanied by guidelines for keeping a pest-free home herbarium. "If I was so fortunate as to encounter a name, was it True and Inviolate, or was it a haphazard field guess?" Cartoons.
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