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Publications and Reports: 1992

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A Canadian Odyssey: The search for the elusive Phaeocollybia.

Phaeocollybia in western Canada with observations on the P. kauffmanii complex.

Studying the effects of harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Oregon's Mt. Hood National Forest.

Studying the effects of mushroom harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Oregon's Mt. Hood National Forest.

Fungus-tree partnership provokes innovative study.

 

  • Lorelei Norvell. 1992.
    A Canadian Odyssey: The search for the elusive Phaeocollybia. Mushroom, The Journal 10(2): 9-12.
    CONTENTS: A humorous yet mystical account of exploring the ancient coastal spruce forests of the upper Carmanah Valley on Vancouver Island in pursuit of the first recorded Phaeocollybia species. "But now … I appear to have participated in stumbling upon that Holy Grail of fledgling mycologists everywhere: discovering a new, unnamed mushroom. Or two." Photographs. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
    -- Cited in Macrofungi of British Columbia: requirements for inventory (1997, Redhead)
  • LL Norvell, SA Redhead. 1992.
    Phaeocollybia in western Canada with observations on the P. kauffmanii complex. Abstract in Inoculum 43(1-3): 45-46.
    ABSTRACT: The genus Phaeocollybia (Cortinariaceae, Agaricales) is represented by 3 species in eastern and 27 in western North America. Relatively abundant in the dense coastal rainforests of northern California, Oregon, and Washington, no Phaeocollybia had been found in western Canada until October 1991. The discovery of two species on Vancouver Island in British Columbia extended the range of Phaeocollybia northward. Both taxa proved to be previously undescribed, with one macroscopically quite similar to P. kauffmanii. Comparison of microscopic morphological features of numerous P. kauffmanii exsiccati with the type of Naucoria kauffmanii has revealed a complex comprised of at least three microscopically distinct taxa differentiated by basidiospore morphology and the presence/absence of clamp connections. Further fieldwork coupled with chemical, molecular and ecological analyses of North American collections should reveal whether such subtle character differences are valid criteria for differentiating species in this complex. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
  • LL Norvell. 1992.
    Studying the effects of harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Oregon's Mt. Hood National Forest. In Wild Mushroom Harvesting Discussion Session Minutes. Edited by DeGeus, Redhead, Callan. Province of British Columbia, Ministry of Forests: Victoria, British Columbia. 9-15.
  • LL Norvell. 1992.
    Studying the effects of mushroom harvesting on chanterelle productivity in Oregon's Mt. Hood National Forest. Abstract in Northwest Natural Sciences Annual Meeting Program: p. 34.
    CONTENTS: Both publications provide background on the harvesting controversy in western North America and give an overview of the site, experimental design and protocols followed by the Oregon Cantharellus Study Project now being conducted by Oregon Mycological Society volunteers. The ten-year study, now in its sixth year, will attempt to determine the impact of chanterelle removal upon the subsequent sporocarp abundance and biomass. Since 1986, new chanterelles have been flagged by numbered skewers and mapped by triangulation with the dimensions of each fruiting body recorded every two weeks through the fruiting season. Since 1989 six of the ten plots have been harvested with chanterelles removed by cutting (3 plots) or pulling (3 plots). Four plots (in which no chanterelle removal is permitted) serve as controls. Three years of harvesting data indicate that picking chanterelles does not have an adverse impact on subsequent chanterelle productivity over the short term. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)]
    --1992a cited in Biodiversity in British Columbia: Our Changing Environment (1993, Redhead chapter); Cantharellus cibarius: Mycorrhiza Formation and Ecology (Danell, 1994); Ecology of Commercially Harvested Chanterelle Mushrooms (Pilz et al. 2003); Influence of Environmental Factors on Fruiting of Edible, Mycorrhizal Mushrooms (1994, Largent & Sime); Canadian Journal of Botany (Arnolds, 1995); Dancing with the Elephant: Proceedings of the Hillsboro Special Forests Products (1995; Liegel); Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Meeting of the California Pest Council (Largent & Sime 1995); Mycology in Sustainable Development: Expanding Concepts, Vanishing Borders (1996, Redhead chapter); Macrofungi of British Columbia: requirements for inventory (1997, Redhead)
    --1992b cited in Dancing with the Elephant: Proceedings of the Hillsboro Special Forests Products (1995; Liegel)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1992.
    Fungus-tree partnership provokes innovative study. Western Forester 37(2): 22.
    CONTENTS: An overview of the purpose and methodology of the cooperative Oregon Mycological Society/USDA Forest Service/City of Portland "Oregon Cantharellus Study Project" which seeks to investigate the ecology of the chanterelle and the impact of mushroom harvesting on subsequent productivity. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)]
    -- Cited in Dancing with the Elephant: Proceedings of the Hillsboro Special Forests Products (1995; Liegel); Ecology of Commercially Harvested Chanterelle Mushrooms (Pilz et al. 2003); Mycology in Sustainable Development: Expanding Concepts, Vanishing Borders (1996, Redhead chapter)
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