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Publications and Reports: 1994

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Valdensinia heterodoxa (Sclerotiniaceae) in the United States.

Squamanita contortipes, the Rosetta Stone of a mycoparasitic agaric genus.

The Who's Who of mushroom versus mushroom -- mycoparasitism of agaric basidiomata by other agarics in the Pacific Northwest.

A Preliminary Report on the Fungi of Barlow Pass, Washington.

Macrofungi of old-growth Abies forests in the Pacific Northwest.

Phaeocollybia in Western North America.

Snowbank fungi in Washington and British Columbia.

Systematics of Laccaria (Agaricales) in the Continental United States and Canada, with discussion on Extralimital taxa and descriptions of extant types. by Gregory M. Mueller. 1992. Fieldiana -- Botany: New Series, #30. Publication 1435. Field Museum of Natural History. 158 pp.

Omphalina sensu lato in North America 1-2. 1: Omphalina wynniae and the genus Chrysomphalina. 2: Omphalina sensu Bigelow.

 

  • Lorelei L Norvell, Scott A Redhead. 1994.
    Valdensinia heterodoxa (Sclerotiniaceae) in the United States. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 24: 1981-1983.
    CONTENTS: First records of this leaf spot disease causal agent in the USA (in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon) on ericaceous hosts: Gaultheria shallon, Vaccinium alaskense, V. membranaceum) and new Canadian records. SEM photographs of the multicellular infective anamorph (Valdensia heterodoxa) show the hygroscopic arms that push against the leaf surface, causing the propagule to snap off to spring several centimeters against other leaves. Also discussed are symptoms and sclerotia. (See also Projects: Biodiversity)
    -- Cited in Ainsworth & Bisby's Dictionary of the Fungi (1995, Hawksworth et al.); Australian New Crops (Fletcher, 2001); Mycological Research (Vogelgsang & Shamoun, 2002); PhD Dissertation (pdf) (Strengbom - 2002, Umeň University, Sweden)
  • SA Redhead, JF Ammirati, GR Walker, LL Norvell, MB Puccio. 1994.
    Squamanita contortipes, the Rosetta Stone of a mycoparasitic agaric genus. Canadian Journal of Botany 72: 1812-1824.
    ABSTRACT: Fungal biodiversity studies on the Olympic peninsula, Washington, have uncovered the key to understanding one of the most enigmatic mushroom genera worldwide. Discovery of a mushroom (Squamanita contortipes) on another grossly distorted but identifiable agaric (Galerina sp.) that retained partial fertility and morphology provides documentation of parasitism and gall formation by the genus Squamanita. This revelation leads to a reinterpretation of all Squamanitas as co-mingled hosts and parasites and supplies a simple explanation for anatomical mixtures of tissues erroneously cited as evidence linking the Agaricaceae, Tricholomataceae, and Amanitaceae. It also resolves six decades of controversy over the identity or function of enlarged bases that often bear chlamydospores. Parasitism of mushroom fruitbodies by other mushrooms is a rare phenomenon (<20 reported species globally). With the addition of accepted Squamanita species, the number of known sporophorous parasitic agarics worldwide is increased by one-third and the number of obligate mycoparasitic mushroom genera is doubled. ALSO INCLUDED: Description of S. contortipes, revision of the genus, key to species worldwide, host index for Squamanita, and a general review (151 references) of mycoparasitic agarics on other fungal fruit bodies. KEY WORDS: Amanita, Armillaria, Asterophora, Astraeus, Claudopus, Clitocybe, Collybia, Coprinus, Cystoderma, Entoloma, Galerina, Helvella, Kuehneromyces, Microcollybia, Nyctalis, Phaeolepiota, Psathyrella, Rhodocybe, Russula, Scleroderma, Volvariella, Xerocomus, chlamydospores, basidiospore pigmentation, protocarpic tuber, old-growth forest, sclerotia. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
    --Cited in Allionia (Vizzini & Girlanda 1998); Bioscience (Petersen & Hughes 1999); British Fungus Flora #8 (1998 - Watling & Turnbull); Brittonia (Halling1996); Coolia (van der Aa 1995); Farbatlas der Basidiomyceten (Moser & Jühlich 2000); Mushroom The Journal (Rogers 1995); Mycological Research (Fraser & Morse1995, Hughes et al. 2001); Mycologist(Moore 1995); The Mycota (Chapter 5: Hibbett & Thorn 2001); Nature (Gee 1995); Neue Zuricher Zeitung (July 19, 1995); Taxon (Redhead & Seifert 2001).
  • SA Redhead, JF Ammirati, GR Walker, LL Norvell, MB Puccio, TE O'Dell, MT Seidl, S Gamiet. 1994.
    The Who's Who of mushroom versus mushroom -- mycoparasitism of agaric basidiomata by other agarics in the Pacific Northwest. Fifth International Mycological Congress Abstracts, p. 178.
    CONTENTS: Documentation of the discovery that the mushroom genus Squamanita is mycoparasitic on other mushrooms, causing them to form galls from which the fruit bodies of the Squamanita arise. Previous treatments of Squamanita have mistakenly included features of the host's galls as parts of the Squamanita, and this has led to incorrect familial classification.
  • JF Ammirati, GR Walker, LL Norvell, MT Seidl, Puget Sound Mycological Society, SA Redhead, JH Ginns, HH Burdsall, TJ Volk. 1994.
    Macrofungi of old-growth Abies forests in the Pacific Northwest. Abstract in Fifth International Mycological Congress Abstracts, p. 4.
    CONTENTS: Both publications document 267 species and varieties of macrofungi found in an old-growth forest in Washington State. Dr Joe Ammirati of the University of Washington has coordinated a largely voluntary field crew that regularly samples the site to help provide baseline data on species diversity. Rare and taxonomically difficult species were identified by specialists included as authors with the amateur club, which donated hundreds of hours of labor. (See also Projects: Northwest Forest Plan, Biodiversity)
  • LL Norvell, JF Ammirati, SA Redhead. 1994.
    Phaeocollybia in Western North America. Abstract in Fifth International Mycological Congress Abstracts, p. 158.
    ABSTRACT: Phaeocollybia (Cortinariaceae, Agaricales) is a biologically intriguing genus of mushrooms flagged in recent literature as a generic component of old-growth Pacific coast mesic forests in the United States and Canada. Over one-third of the 60 known species occur from southern British Columbia to northern California, making the region the center of greatest known diversity worldwide. The most salient macrocharacter of Phaeocollybia is the long subterranean pseudorhiza, indicative of the enigmatic biological status. Excavations have exposed different growth patterns.; basidiomes arise either in a fasciculate "starburst" from a rhizomorph, successively from existing pseudorhizae, or from a mycelial mass associated with mycorrhizal roots. Examination of over 500 recent collections confirms that microscopic tibiiform processes are a generic feature. These secretory processes, consistently found on the cortical hyphae of the pseudorhizal base and mycelia, may be homologous with the tibiiform cheilocystidia found in some species. Another generic character appears to be the formation of a primordial sheath; velate primordia have been discovered in almost all primordia thus far examined, with retention of tibiiform processes on the sheath differentially retained as fibrillose patches on stipe and pileus of different species. The characteristic tibiiform-covered mycelia have been found leading to rootlets sheathed in a mycorrhizal mantle, lending support to the theory that some species are mycorrhizal. To date, species have been differentiated by morphological and ecological characters. Random Fragment Length Polymorphisms of the ITS region associated with the 5.8S rDNA gene are being generated to test criteria used for sectional classification based on basidiospore characters, cheilocystidial form, and the occurrence of clamp connections. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1994.
    Systematics of Laccaria (Agaricales) in the Continental United States and Canada, with discussion on Extralimital taxa and descriptions of extant types. by Gregory M. Mueller. 1992. Fieldiana -- Botany: New Series, #30. Publication 1435. Field Museum of Natural History. 158 pp. Mycophile May/June: p. 6.
    CONTENTS: Book Review. "The monograph's obvious strengths are a thorough consideration of characters taken from widely distributed and numerous collections, and a workable key. While work on the genus Laccaria is by no means complete, Mueller is to be commended for presenting a well-organized treatise that is one of the first to combine well-thought out morphological, cultural, and molecular analyses of the taxa under discussion."
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Scott A Redhead, Joseph F Ammirati. 1994.
    Omphalina sensu lato in North America 1-2. 1: Omphalina wynniae and the genus Chrysomphalina. 2: Omphalina sensu Bigelow. Mycotaxon 50: 379-407.
    ABSTRACT: The four-year observation of an Oregon population of Omphalina wynniae has facilitated reevaluation of its generic placement and that of other North American omphalinoid agarics. In Part 1, the species is illustrated and described in detail, its nomenclatural history discussed, and the new combination Chrysomphalina grossula proposed for it. The genus Chrysomphalina is reevaluated -- new combinations C. chrysophylla var. salmonispora, C. chrysophylla var. hoffmanii are made; Gerronema strombodes is removed from Chrysomphalina and the new combination G. xanthophyllum is made for a vicariant European taxon that has been confused with G. strombodes. A key to the known species and varieties of Chrysomphalina is presented. In Part 2, the division of Omphalina sensu Bigelow and the generic concepts of Gerronema, Haasiella, Omphalina, Phytoconis, Pseudoarmillariella, and Rickenella are discussed. New combinations include Omphalina hohensis and O. marchantiae, and Hygrocybe luteoomphaloides nom. nov. is proposed for O. occidentalis. A key to generic segregates of Omphalina sensu Bigelow and expanded generic descriptions are provided. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
    -- Cited in Bollettino del Gruppo Micologico G. Bresadola (Contu 1997); The Bryologist (Lichen Check List 1995); British Fungus Flora Agarics & Boleti 8 (Watling & Turnbull 1998); Bulletin de la SocietÚ mycologique de France (Chiaffi & Surault 1996); Canadian Journal of Botany (Petersen 1995); Flora Agaricina Neerlandica (Kuyper 1995); Handbook to Additional Fungal Species... in the NW Forest Plan (Castellano et al. 2003); Index of Fungi (1994, Kirk ş ed).; Matchmaker PNW (Gibson & Gibson 2001); Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (Moncalvo et al. 2002); Mycologia (Redhead et al. 1995, Desjardin & Hemmes 1997, Johnson & Petersen 1997); Mycotaxon (Redhead, Moncalvo et al. 2002, Redhead Lutzoni et al. 2002); Mykoweb (pdf) (Desjardin 2001: ); A Nomenclatural Study of Armillaria and Armillariella species (1995, Volk & Burdsall); Systematic Biology (Lutzoni 1997)
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