Home || Curriculum Vitae || Publications || Projects

 

Publications and Reports: 1997

Jump to:             2003 || 2002 || 2001 || 2000
  1999 || 1998 || 1997 || 1996 || 1995 || 1994 || 1993 || 1992 || 1991 || 1990
  1989 || 1988 || 1987 || 1986 || 1985 || 1984 || 1983      

 

(The Askus column) What if you've found a new species?

Ask the Professionals (The Askus column): Why no agreement on agreement?

Phaeocollybia: The Sixth Year.

Cantharellus formosus and the Pacific Golden Chanterelle harvest in western North America.

Ask the Professionals: Is that new genus here to stay?

Ask Us: What's so great about old dried up mushrooms? (How useful are herbarium species?).

 

  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 1997.
    (The Askus column) What if you've found a new species? Mushroom, The Journal 15(4): 11-16.
    CONTENTS: The authors answer a query as to how amateur mycologists should proceed when they think they've found a new species by humorously outlining the references to consult, the nomenclatural rules to follow, and how to check taxonomic conclusions. "But beware! If the feature is mind-boggingly different from all others in the genus, are you sure you have it in the right genus?"
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 1997.
    Ask the Professionals (The Askus column): Why no agreement on agreement? Mushroom, The Journal 15(3): 12-13.
    CONTENTS: An investigation of the ins and outs of agreement between adjectives and Latin and Greek based genus names illustrated by Bulgaria globosa and Sarcosoma globosum. "Unfortunately there are cases (especially when Greek is Latinized) where endings do not match so tidily. "-soma" is neuter." Cartoon.
  • LL Norvell. 1997.
    Phaeocollybia: The Sixth Year. Abstract in Inoculum 48(3): 28.
    CONTENTS: Since 1991 an unusually large number of collections and excavations of Phaeocollybia basidiomes from western North American coastal coniferous rainforests has helped advance morphological, developmental, and biological knowledge of this FEMAT-flagged agaric genus. Dissection and microscopical observation of numerous primordia confirm the generic significance of pellicular veil and tibiiform diverticula and suggest a (pileo) stipitocarpic monovelangiocarpy for a genus with a hitherto unexplored ontogeny. Examination of intact pseudorhizae reveals the existence of four different pseudorhizal growth patterns and implies a rhizomorphic function for some of the thread-like stipe extensions (now called "rhizomorphic pseudorhizae") on Phaeocollybia attenuata, P. rufotubulina, and P. scatesiae basidiomes. Examinations of rootlets excavated with pseudorhizal origins from several different species continue to provide support for an ectomycorrhizal hypothesis for the genus. Computerized multivariate, phenetic, and cladistic analyses of morphological and RFLP-based molecular character sets have been used to help circumscribe numerous new taxa and support the existence of 30 species in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell, Eric Danell. 1997.
    Cantharellus formosus and the Pacific Golden Chanterelle harvest in western North America. Mycotaxon 65: 285-322.
    CONTENTS: This is the first detailed account of the identity of the commonly harvested western chanterelle, which is here named the Pacific Golden Chanterelle. The type locality for the name Cantharellus formosus E.J.H. Corner (1966) on Vancouver Island, was located and visited to procure fresh specimens for DNA analysis. A description with illustrations is published. A new chanterelle, the Rainbow Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius var. roseocanus Redhead, Norvell & Danell) is described, illustrated, and compared to C. formosus. Documentation of harvesting is recorded. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)
    -- Cited in BC NTFP Mushrooms (Gamiet et al. 2003); Botanical Electronic News (Ceska 1998); Botanical Forest products: Effects upon operational planning (1998 ­ Atwood, preparer); Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference (Mathews 1999); Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003); Farbatlas der Basidiomyceten (2000 - Moser & Jülich); Forest Ecology and Management (Bergemann & Largent 2000, Pilz & Molina 2002); Handbook to Strategy 1 fungal species in the Northwest Forest Plan (1999, Castellano et al.); Matchmaker PNW (Gibson & Gibson 2001); McIlvainea (Litten 1998); Mycological Research (Dahlman et al. 2000); Mykoweb (pdf) (Desjardin 2001); Recent publications of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (1998 - Second Quarter)
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 1997.
    Ask the Professionals: Is that new genus here to stay? Mushroom, The Journal 15(2): 11-13.
    CONTENTS: A question-answer discussion on the stability of fungal nomenclature in light of DNA analyses, specifically addressing the shiitake, Lentinula edodes. "What hurry? The genus Lentinula is NOT a "new" genus, described as it was four score and eight years ago (1909)."Cartoon.
  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 1997.
    Ask Us: What's so great about old dried up mushrooms? (How useful are herbarium species?). Mushroom, The Journal 15(1): 9-11.
    CONTENTS: A general discussion on the importance of scientific documentation of specimens and the resulting fungal herbaria to society at large and science, told with dry humor. "But, when you boast about the spectacular fuzzy sandozy (Oxyporus -soon to be Bridgeporus - nobilissimus you found in Wyoming to those in the Pacific Northwest trying to save it, you'll want something more than your word and impeccable taxonomic skills."
^top

All content copyright © 2000-2004 Pacific Northwest Mycology Service, LLC.

Last updated on October 13, 2003