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Publications and Reports: 1998

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(The Askus column) Additional, seemingly useless names?

1998 Fall Foray Report: 98 species catalogued (from the Herbarium of the Oregon Mycological Society).

1998 Annual Show Report: 270 species catalogued (from the Herbarium of the Oregon Mycological Society).

(The Askus column) The genus and how it breeds.

Observations on the development, morphology and biology of Phaeocollybia.

The Oregon Cantharellus Study Project: Pacific Golden Chanterelle preliminary observations and productivity data (1986-1997).

ROD: Strategy 3 -- Fungal species evaluation (11 Gilled Basidiomycete Strategy 3 Species).

1998 Dr Harry D Thiers NAMA Foray Floods Asilomar.

The Biology and Taxonomy of Pacific Northwest Species of Phaeocollybia

 

  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 1998.
    (The Askus column) Additional, seemingly useless names? Mushroom, The Journal 16(4): 28-29.
    CONTENTS: The continuing saga of how scientists segregate genera from existing ones, and an explanation of how peer review affects scientific thought. "A ‘new' genus is ‘discovered' during a microscopic exam, literature search, or bath-time rumination when it becomes obvious that Things Definitely Are Not what they Have Seemed. Lurking among the corralled sheep is a hidden genus with canine teeth and a superficial resemblance to a sheep, or more mycologically, among the Hygrophori, a ‘Pseudohygrophorus'." Cartoon. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1998.
    1998 Fall Foray Report: 98 species catalogued (from the Herbarium of the Oregon Mycological Society). MushRumors 37(6): 11-12.
    CONTENTS: List of the species vouchered from the 1998 annual Oregon Mycological Society foray held at Fall City, Polk County, Oregon.
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1998.
    1998 Annual Show Report: 270 species catalogued (from the Herbarium of the Oregon Mycological Society). MushRumors 37(6): 10.
    CONTENTS: List of the species vouchered from the annual Oregon Mycological Society show held in Portland, Oregon.
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 1998.
    (The Askus column) The genus and how it breeds. Mushroom, The Journal 16(3): 5-9.
    CONTENTS: The authors respond to a question regarding the hygrophoraceous origins of Pseudohygrocybe, Cuphophyllus, Gliophorus, Neohygrocybe. A general and humorous account of how scientific names are published and how peer review filters and affects the publication process. "Occasionally (fortunately rarely), a copy disappears into the void -- a reviewer may have either died or left the country with your manuscript intent on Pulling a Fast One, a disgruntled postal employee may wrap her surplus M-16 in your envelope, or the ship between England and America may sink with all mail aboard…." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1998.
    Observations on the development, morphology and biology of Phaeocollybia. Mycological Research 102(5): 615-630.
    ABSTRACT: Investigation of Phaeocollybia in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California has led to a better understanding of the characters and biology of the genus as a whole. Generically significant characters - pseudorhizas, pellicular veil, tibiiform diverticula, and sarcodimitic tissues - are examined in depth with four variations of branched and unbranched pseudorhizal patterns outlined. Basidiome development is traced from subterrancean initiation to fully mature emergent basidiomes. Hypotheses on the ontogeny of Phaeocollybia basidiomes and biological associations are developed based on extensive observations of primordia and numerous field excavations. Comparisons between rhizomorphs and the thread-like pseudorhizal extensions of certain species are made and the term "rhizomorphic pseudorhiza" is introduced. Possible biological strategies are explored and evidence for consideration of Phaeocollybia as a mycorrhizal genus is presented. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
    -- Cited in Australasian Mycologist (Rees & Syme, 1999); Dictionary of Fungi (Kirk et al., 2001); Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (Moncalvo et al. 2002)
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Judy Roger. 1998.
    The Oregon Cantharellus Study Project: Pacific Golden Chanterelle preliminary observations and productivity data (1986-1997). Abstract in Inoculum 49(2): 40.
    ABSTRACT: Cantharellus formosus (the Pacific Golden Chanterelle) is the principal choice edible ectomycorrhizal chanterelle commercially harvested from Pacific Northwest (British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California) coastal forest. In 1986 the Oregon Mycological Society initiated North America's longest continuous investigation into the impact of harvesting on subsequent productivity. A total of ten individual plots (in three replicate blocks) were established in a 120 year old Tsuga-Pseudotsuga stand in the buffer zone of Portland's Bull Run watershed in Mt Hood National Forest. Within the plots 292 species of fungi (123 mycorrhizal, 106 terricolous saprophytes, 56 lignicolous saprophytes and parasites, 7 fungal parasites) have been recorded. Since 1986 volunteer researchers have tracked 5471 chanterelles (individually numbered, flagged, measured and mapped) every two weeks from July to December. Beginning in 1989 all chanterelles over 1 cm in diameter have been removed by cutting (3 plots) or pulling (3 plots), weighed before and after drying to determine biomass and retained for future molecular analysis; the remaining four non-harvest plots are monitored as controls. Nine years of harvesting data indicate that removal of chanterelles may slightly stimulate subsequent chanterelle productivity (measured both as numbers of basidiomes and as biomass) in the short term. A statistically significant positive correlation between mean summer temperatures and numbers of chanterelles is suggested, but there appears to be little to no correlation between productivity and harvesting method. Other observations include the relatively slow growth rate (e.g., expansion of the pileus diameter at a rate of 2-5 cm/month) and long life span with fruiting bodies observed in situ for as long as 90 days. Factors that may influence productivity include canopy cover, short and long term weather patterns, and the presence of coarse woody debris. The internationally recognized study demonstrates how collaboration between professionals and amateurs (who have together thus far generously donated nearly 5000 hours of labor) can contribute significant and valuable scientific knowledge. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)
    -- Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1998 (July 7).
    ROD: Strategy 3 -- Fungal species evaluation (11 Gilled Basidiomycete Strategy 3 Species). Parts 1-3. (Unpublished Final Report on file at the Forest Sciences Laboratory, Corvallis, OR). 1496 pp. 2 disks.
    CONTENTS: The full report consists an overview of the eleven Strategy 3 species with full taxonomic and nomenclatural discussions, field & technical descriptions, ecological and distribution notes, lists of similar species with distinguishing characters, list of published illustrations and descriptions, and comprehensive bibliographies (Item 1); a collections database (Item 2: available to the public only with permission of Regional Mycologist, Dr Tina Dreisbach); recommendations for preliminary revisions of the ROD (Record of Decision): Appendix J2 (Item 3). The 11 species evaluated were Baeospora myriadophylla, Chrysomphalina grossula (< Omphalina wynniae), Fayodia bisphaerigera (< "F. gracilipes"), Mythicomyces corneipes, Phaeocollybia attenuata, Ph. fallax, Ph. olivacea, Ph. pseudofestiva, Ph. spadicea, and Phytoconis ericetorum (> Lichenomphalia umbellifera).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1998.
    1998 Dr Harry D Thiers NAMA Foray Floods Asilomar. The Mycophile 39:3(1-5).
    CONTENTS: Summary of the 1998 annual foray of the North American Mycological Association, held in honor of Dr Harry D Thiers, at Asilomar on the Monterey Peninsula, California.
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1998.
    The Biology and Taxonomy of Pacific Northwest Species of Phaeocollybia (Agaricales, Cortinariaceae). PhD Dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle. 391 pp.

    ABSTRACT: Investigation of the agaric genus Phaeocollybia (Cortinariaceae) in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and California has resulted in a revised taxonomic revision of the genus in the Pacific Northwest and led to a better understanding of the characters and biology of the genus as a whole. Generically significant characters - pseudorhizae, pellicular veil, tibiiform diverticula, and sarcodimitic tissues - are examined in depth with four variations of branched and unbranched pseudorhizal patterns outlined. Basidiome development is traced from subterranean initiation to fully mature emergent basidiomes. Hypotheses on the monovelangiocarpic development of Phaeocollybia basidiomes are developed based on extensive observations of primordia and numerous field excavations. Comparisons between rhizomorphs and the thread-like pseudorhizal extensions of certain species are made and the term 'rhizomorphic pseudorhiza' is introduced. Possible biological strategies are explored and evidence for consideration of Phaeocollybia as a mycorrhizal genus is presented.

    Morphological characters obtained from specimen examination and molecular characters generated from PCR amplification and single restriction enzyme digestion by 9 restriction enzymes of ribosomal DNA were subjected to computer-assisted phenetic and phylogenetic analyses. Analytical results support recognition of several new species not previously described from this region and imply separation of other species judged as conspecific by earlier workers. Analyses of data from P. kauffmanii and four associated new species within a species complex demonstrate the importance of incorporating molecular data and computer analyses in modern taxonomic research. Preliminary analyses of 25 putative taxa suggest that sections proposed by previous investigators are probably polyphyletic. Problems encountered using restriction fragment length polymorphisms derived from differently sized amplified regions in phylogenetic analyses are also briefly discussed.

    A conspectus of the Pacific Northwest species is accompanied by an emended generic description, discussion of placement of Phaeocollybia within the Cortinariaceae, and dichotomous and synoptic keys to all 25 currently recognized taxa. Full technical descriptions of nine new species (P. ammiratii, P. benzokauffmanii, P. luteosquamulosa, P. phaeogaleroides, P. pleurocystidiata, P. redheadii, P. rifflipes, P. rufotubulina, and P. tibiikauffmanii) accompany emended descriptions of sixteen previously described taxa. Phaeocollybia carmanahensis is synonymized with P. oregonensis. Phaeocollybia deceptiva is excluded from the genus. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)

    -- Cited in Bibliography of Systematic Mycology (2001); Handbook to Strategy 1 fungal species in the Northwest Forest Plan (1999, Castellano et al.); Mykoweb (pdf) (Desjardin 2001); Systematic Studies in Cortinarius (Agaricales, Cortinariaceae) Subgenus Myxacium, Sections Defibulati and Myxacium in western North America (Seidl 1999. U of Washington PhD dissertation); U of Michigan Herbarium Webpage (1999); USDA-BLM (pdf) (2001)
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Last updated on October 13, 2003