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Publications and Reports: 1999

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The October 22-24 1999 Camp Cascade OMS Fall Foray List.

Musings of a new mycological miner: Summaries of papers on North American macrofungi, lichens, and myxomycetes published in 1999.

1161 -- The Oregon Douglas-fir community.

Oregon Douglas-fir fungal communities. Abstract in

1170 -- Butterflies of the soil 1999: GSMNP-ATBI fungal pilot study.

Kingdom Fungi and the Great Smoky Mountains ATBI.

Flash! Mushroom debate in Oregon senate makes headline news!

(The Askus column) American epitaphs and epithets.

Pukey Point common names contest to close Oct. 1.

Anatomie der Hymenomyceten, by H. Clémençon. F. Flück-Wirth, Internationale Buchhandlung für Botanik und Naturwissenschaften. 1997. XI + 997 pages.

Notes from the Herbarium: Spring 1999.

(The Askus column) The Appellation Trail: A one-act play.

(The Askus column) What do you call a Matsutake?

(The Askus column) In search of the dead.

 

  • Lorelei Norvell. 1999.
    The October 22-24 1999 Camp Cascade OMS Fall Foray List. MushRumors 38(6): 5-6.
    CONTENTS: Annotated list of 135 species vouchered during the 1998 annual Oregon Mycological Society foray held at Camp Cascade, Marion County, Oregon. (Dr Norvell, guest mycologist.)
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1999.
    Musings of a new mycological miner: Summaries of papers on North American macrofungi, lichens, and myxomycetes published in 1999. McIlvainea 14(1): 53-72.
    CONTENTS: Contents of 41 recent taxonomic, biological, or ecological research papers are capsulized to aid those lacking regular access to the technical literature. Reference is also made to 28 earlier publications. The author notes new agaric (Cortinarius, Crepidotus, Flammulina, Gymnopus, Lepiota, Rhodocollybia, and Russula) species and covers recently discovered Melanotus and Mycena species synonymies. New (Marthanella) and old (Zelleromyces) basidiotruffle genera are covered along with the Ascomycetes Daldinia and Hypomyces. Brief synopses are also made of lichen and myxomycete papers. Other sections include (i) "Building computer-based keys," (ii) "Come up and see me sometime: mating studies and species concepts," (iii) "Talking molecules" (exposing phylogenetic relationships within/or among certain genera or families - Agaricus, Lepiota, Amanita, Gomphaceae, Pezizales), (iv) "Biological and ecological out-takes," and (v) "In praise of us" (a reprise of Watling's "The role of the amateur in mycology").
  • LL Norvell, RL Exeter. 1999.
    1161 -- The Oregon Douglas-fir community. XVI International Botanical Congress: Abstracts p. 486.
    -- Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • LL Norvell, RL Exeter. 1999.
    Oregon Douglas-fir fungal communities. Abstract in Northwest Scientific Association 1999 Annual Meeting Bulletin: p. 45.
    ABSTRACT: In 1998 PNW-MS and USDI-BLM scientists initiated two five-year fungal community species richness studies in BLM reserve Douglas-fir forests. They monitored all epigeous ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycetes from early-, mid- and late successional stands (Polk County Chronosequence Study) and from a mid-successional plantation scheduled for five different thinning treatments [from untreated to regeneration cut] (Green Peak Density Study). Two parallel elevationally gradient strip transects (400m2 total/plot) are sampled twice a week over six months; sporocarps are photographed and annotated, printed and tested chemically, and dried as vouchers. 132 "density" and 134 "chronosequence" species identified from morphological and anatomical characters were sampled during the first season. In the age-class study, species richness ratios were similar for Inocybe, Lactarius and Russula at all sites and higher for Dermocybe in the 25-yo stand with Phaeocollybia restricted to the 150-yo stand. At the 65-yo density site, 22% species sampled were common to all treatment plots and 49% were found in only one plot. (See also Projects: Northwest Forest Plan, Biodiversity)
  • LL Norvell, RE Tulloss, Asheville Mushroom Club. 1999.
    1170 -- Butterflies of the soil 1999: GSMNP-ATBI fungal pilot study. XVI International Botanical Congress Abstracts p. 487.
    ABSTRACT: Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) is now home to America's first All-Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI). During the next 10-15 years the Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (TWIG) and other researchers will map and identify all organisms within the Park's 810 square miles. This year a rapidly expanding Fungal TWIG will foster independent taxonomic research of macrofungi, foliar pathogens, lichens, VA-mycorrhizae, water molds and soil / dung / animal-associated microfungi. An important TWIG contributor is the "Butterflies of the Soil" project, an important ATBI model pilot-study designed to illustrate how trained mycologists and para-taxonomists can more efficiently uncover previously unreported taxa and discover species new to science. Every month from March to November, pilot-study volunteers sample sporocarps of all macrofungi found within a 400m2 transect and send the photographed and dried vouchers to specialists for identification. Many new taxa are anticipated as a result of the inventory. (See also Projects: Biodiversity)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1999.
    Kingdom Fungi and the Great Smoky Mountains ATBI. Inoculum 50(1): 5-7.
    Scouring the Smokies. MushRumors. 38(2): 6-7, 10.
    Mycophiles join species blitz in the Smokies. Mycophile 40(2): 1, 5-6.
    Smokies - ATBI Update. Mycophile 40(4): 5,12.
    The GSMNP-ATBI diaries. Inoculum 50(4): 5.
    The GSMNP-ATBI diaries: Fungal TWIG Diary Entry 4. Inoculum 50(5): 28.
    CONTENTS: A series of short news items outlining the activities of the Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (TWIG) during the launch of the fifteen-year All-Taxa Biological Inventory (ATBI) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) spearheaded by the National Park Service and the non-profit research organization Discover Life in America (DLIA). As Coordinator of the Fungal TWIG, the author gives an overview of the high level of biodiversity in the park, outlines ATBI objectives and goals, and encourages volunteers from the ranks of professional mycologists and amateur naturalists. She also details formation of "Butterflies of the Soil," one of two pilot studies selected by DLIA to illustrate the benefits to be gained by training parataxonomists to participate in the ATBI. She also covers training workshops conducted by Macromycete Coordinator Rod Tulloss and the establishment and monitoring of the permanent transect overseen by Tulloss and On-site Coordinator Theresa Rey. (See also Projects: Biodiversity)
    --Cited in Persoonia (Krisai-Greilhuber et al., 2002)
  • Norvell, Lorelei. 1999.
    Flash! Mushroom debate in Oregon senate makes headline news! Inoculum 50(4): 5.
    CONTENTS: Report on the humorous legislative debate preceding approval of the Pacific Golden Chanterelle (Cantharellus formosus) as the official Oregon State mushroom. (See also Projects: Chanterelles)
  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 1999.
    (The Askus column) American epitaphs and epithets. Mushroom, The Journal 17(4): 27-29.
    CONTENTS: The authors reveal the history of three American mycologists honored by the species epithets Corticium oakesii, Entoloma murraii, and Mycena leaiana and explain how the American Curtis and English Berkeley came to name the three species. "So what have we learned? That the path from field to formal name is rarely a straight shot but resembles nothing more than a scholarly bucket-brigade resulting - it is to be hoped - in the illumination rather than the dousing of the natural world." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 1999.
    Pukey Point common names contest to close Oct. 1. Mushroom, The Journal 17(4): 31-32.
    CONTENTS: The authors reprint the contest list of 54 common names and supply hints to help in associating them with the proper scientific names.
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 1999.
    Anatomie der Hymenomyceten, by H. Clémençon. F. Flück-Wirth, Internationale Buchhandlung für Botanik und Naturwissenschaften. 1997. XI + 997 pages. Mycologia 91(3): 557-558.
    CONTENTS: Book Review. "Every so often a landmark publication comes along that is destined to become indispensable to research for years to come. Such a work is Heinz Clémençon's new magnum opus -- probably the first time that an entire book is devoted to the cytological and histological exploration of all basidiomycetes with exposed hymenial surfaces -- the agarics, boletes, chanterelles, crusts, brackets, clubs, teeth and corals….Although the text is written in German, Clémençon presents a separate table of contents and 25-page chapter summary in English. The fact that all illustrations and 14 tables are captioned in both German and English makes this work unusually accessible to anglophones. Those even moderately proficient in German will find Clémençon's style clear, lively, straight-forward and easily understood… This truly scholarly and incredibly useful work is -- quite simply -- ‘fantastisch.' Buy this book!"
  • Lorelei Norvell. 1999.
    Notes from the Herbarium: Spring 1999. MushRumors 38(4): 7-8.
    CONTENTS: an annotated field list of the 26 species collected on the April 3 Oregon Mycological Society field trip to Beacon Rock State Park along the Columbia River. Notable species included Helvella compressa, Sarcoscypha coccinea, Coccomyces coronatus, Mollisia cinerea, Omphalina ericetorum, Clitocybe ramigena, Inocybe "cf" queletii, Phellinus lundellii, Hymenochaete tabacina, and Dacrymyces chrysocomus. Collections of Omphalina postii, O. marchantiae, and O. hohensis during the OMS foray at Wallowa Lake in eastern Oregon are also annotated.
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Scott A Redhead. 1999.
    (The Askus column) The Appellation Trail: A one-act play. Mushroom, The Journal 17(3): 13-15.
    CONTENTS: The discussion between two hypothetical characters on the difficulties with identifying mushrooms that wear different names in different field guides results in a contest in which readers are to supply the correct scientific name for each common name on the Pukey Point Club Fall Foray list. "Confusion grows exponentially as our two friends scan the final foray list compiled by a host of other enthusiasts, all consulting different field guides. Shortly thereafter, our friends take up a new hobby - birding, where a robin is a robin is a robin - and never an oriole." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 1999.
    (The Askus column) What do you call a Matsutake? Mushroom, The Journal 17(2): 12-13.
    CONTENTS: The authors address the similarities and differences between the American matsutake (Tricholoma magnivelare) and the "REAL" matsutake (Tricholoma matsutake). They summarize the peregrinations of the two species through different genera, provide references on the mushroom-harvesting saga, and provide a light-hearted key that will help to differentiate the two species. "Key to Matsutakes. (a1) Smells real nice (like money) -> B [Matsutakes in general]; (a2) Smells like nothing -> Something else. (b1) Costs $200/lb. -> REAL matsutake, T. matsutkae; (b2) Costs $100/lb -> American matsutake, T. magnivelare." Cartoon. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 1998-1999.
    (The Askus column) In search of the dead. Mushroom, The Journal 17(1): 13-15.
    CONTENTS: A general discussion on how mycologists track historical records, locate references, and learn about the etymology of scientific names (e.g., Gautieria (a truffle), Gerronema (a mushroom), and Tarzetta (a cup fungus)). "So… as Cooke gives no indication whether he knew a Tarzsomeone (or simply used faulty Italian for some unknown reason), we can only give you more grist for the mill. But be aware that the fungus was originally collected in Hungary, and there is Rehm Exsiccatum No. 53 with still more leads to follow in more dusty tomes." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
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Last updated on October 13, 2003