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Publications and Reports: 2000

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Great Smoky Mountain National Park All-Taxa Biological Inventory Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (TWIG) 1999-2000 comprehensive report.

PNW-MS / BLM Cooperative Oregon Douglas-fir density management - fungal community study: 1998-1999 Annual Report.

PNW-MS / BLM Cooperative Oregon Douglas-fir fungal community chronosequence study: 1998-1999 Annual Report.

Musings of a Mycological Miner - 2000. Research summaries on North American macrofungi, lichens, and myxomycetes.

Phaeocollybia in Western North America 1: The P. kauffmanii complex.

Phaeocollybia in Western North America 2: The vernal P. pleurocystidiata sp. nov. and P. carmanahensis reconsidered.

Stropharia albivelata and its basionym, Pholiota albivelata.

Notes on western North American snowbank fungi.

Commission on Common Mushroom Names for North America.

Here come really-common common names? [NAMA and MSA endorse a commission to make recommendations; "1st List" not expected for one to two years.]

Practical Mycology in the Twenty-first Century.

The GSMNP-ATBI diaries. Inoculum 51(1): 14-15, Inoculum 51(2): 10, Inoculum 51(3): 72, Inoculum 51(4): 20, Inoculum 51(5): 47-49; Inoculum 51(6): 24-25. "Great Smokies project has a new coordinator"

(The Askus column) Bugged? Ask a Mycologist.

(The Askus column) The contest is over and no one got them all right -- but we still have a winner!

 

  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2000 (September 30).
    Great Smoky Mountain National Park All-Taxa Biological Inventory Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (TWIG) 1999-2000 comprehensive report. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service, Portland. 64 pp. (Report filed with Inventory & Monitoring Coordinator, Ranger Keith Langdon, GSMNP headquarters, Gatlinburg, TN).
    CONTENTS: This progress report, written primarily for the 90 members of "TWIG Fungi" and Discover Life in America website, summarizes the activities of the fungal TWIG from preparations for the official Memorial Day (1999) GSMNP-ATBI launch through the summer of 2000. The TWIG index includes addresses, specialties, and ATBI contributions of volunteers and expert taxonomists. The 1999-2000 fungal database lists 1,349 collections (most still in need of expert identification), including at least 24 previously unreported species 'new' to the Park. A revised cross-index to Macrobasidiomycete names and synonyms for species previously reported from the Park is appended, as are auxiliary databases contributed by Baroni, Grand & Vernier, and Rude; 1999-2000 press releases; and a (very) preliminary bibliography.
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2000 (June 1).
    PNW-MS / BLM Cooperative Oregon Douglas-fir density management - fungal community study: 1998-1999 Annual Report. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 33 pp. (Report on file with Botanist Ron Exeter, USDI-BLM, Salem District Office)
    CONTENTS: In 1998 the author and BLM Salem (Oregon) District Botanist Exeter initiated a 6-year study of the impact of forest thinning on epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete species richness in a 55-year old Douglas-fir forest on Green Peak in Oregon’s coast range. All epigeous non-ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes cited in the Northwest Forest Plan were also targeted.
    Collections were sampled from five stands scheduled to undergo different thinning regimes in 1999: untreated (“no-cut”), thinned (3 stands with 120, 80, or 40 residual trees/acre), or regeneration-cut (0 residual trees/acre). The report summarizes methodology and data collected during the first autumn and spring mushroom seasons. Aerial views of the Benton County site accompany soil composition, stand histories, and vegetation analyses of both transects in each stand. Also included are a brief bibliography, a list of all epigeous basidiomycete species cited in the 1994 FSEIS Appendix C-3, a list of epigeous basidiomycetes previously reported from Oregon, a preliminary Inocybe coniferous species index, the baseline pre-treatment list of 186 species (129 targeted) identified from 676 collections, and species richness comparison graphs. (Projects: BLM)
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2000 (June 1).
    PNW-MS / BLM Cooperative Oregon Douglas-fir fungal community chronosequence study: 1998-1999 Annual Report. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 29 pp. (Report on file with Botanist Ron Exeter, USDI-BLM, Salem District Office)
    CONTENTS: In 1998 the author and BLM Salem (Oregon) District Botanist Exeter initiated a proposed five-year study of epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete species richness in 25-year old, 50-year old, and 150-year old adjacent stands in Oregon’s coast range. Also targeted are all epigeous non-ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes flagged in the Northwest Forest Plan. The report summarizes methodology and data collected during the first autumn and spring mushroom seasons. Aerial views of the Polk County site accompany soil composition, stand histories, and vegetation analyses of both transects in each stand. Also included are a brief bibliography, a list of all epigeous basidiomycete species cited in the 1994 FSEIS Appendix C-3, a list of epigeous basidiomycetes previously reported from Oregon, a preliminary Inocybe coniferous species index, a list of 176 species (119 targeted) identified from 452 collections, and species richness comparison graphs. (Projects: BLM)
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2000.
    Musings of a Mycological Miner - 2000. Research summaries on North American macrofungi, lichens, and myxomycetes. McIlvainea 14(2): 51-73.
    CONTENTS: Summaries of 53 recent taxonomic, biological, or ecological research papers (with references to 16 other articles) are provided to aid mushroomers and other mycologists who lack access to the technical literature. The author notes new species and combinations representing agaric (Agaricus, Amanita, Boletus, Cortinarius, Crepidotus, Flammulina, Lactarius, Phaeocollybia, Russula), non-gilled Basidiomycete (Diplomitoporus, Ganoderma, Laetiporus, Phlebiopsis, Scleroderma, Tyromyces), hypogeous (Fevansia, Gastroboletus, Gastrosuillus, Gymnomyces, Hydnotrya, Rhizopogon, Tuber), Ascomycete (Pezoloma, Sepedonium), and slime mold (Trichia) genera. Erection of the new genus, Rhizomarasmius, is noted. Phylogenetic analyses of many genera and fungal families (Amylostereum, Armillaria, Calostoma, Collybia, Ganoderma, Hebeloma, Hypoxylon, Laetiporus, Lentinellus, Myxomphalia, the cantharelloid and clavarioid fungi) are also summarized. Keys and species descriptions published in 8 issues of the British Mycological Society's "popular" journals, Mycologist and Field Mycologist, are listed. Finally, formal proposals to conserve the basionym of matsutake as T. matsutake and the genus Xeromphalina with that spelling are noted. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2000.
    Phaeocollybia in Western North America 1: The P. kauffmanii complex. Canadian Journal of Botany 78: 1055-1076.
    ABSTRACT: Morphological and molecular investigations during a taxonomic reevaluation of the genus Phaeocollybia revealed four new agaric species from British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California that are morphologically similar to P. kauffmanii. All five species produce large basidiomes with brown pilei, stipes with cartilaginous rinds surrounding dense pith, vertical-monopodial pseudorhizae, large verrucose/verruculose, apically beaked basidiospores, and thin-walled, clavate cheilocystidia. The most salient morphological characters distinguishing the new species from P. kauffmanii include: abundant clamp connections (P. ammiratii), a pink-/purple-brown pileus lacking encrusting pigments in the pileipellis (P. benzokauffmanii), a non-viscid, fibrillose, ochraceous pileus with a trilaminate pileipellis (P. luteosquamulosa), and unusually large basidiospores and subglobose subcapitate pedicellate cheilocystidia (P. redheadii). An emended description of P. kauffmanii accompanies technical descriptions and a key to the new species and newly revealed complex. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Scott A Redhead. 2000.
    Phaeocollybia in Western North America 2: The vernal P. pleurocystidiata sp. nov. and P. carmanahensis reconsidered. Mycologia 95: 984-991.
    CONTENTS: Examination of herbarium specimens and newly collected basidiomes combined with molecular analyses of representatives of several different taxa has uncovered the existence of a new Phaeocollybia species from Washington, Oregon, and California. Phaeocollybia pleurocystidiata represents the first species described from the United States and Canada known to exhibit a vernal phenology. Morphological and molecular comparison of the type of P. carmanahensis with newly collected material reveals it to be conspecific with the earlier named P. oregonensis; an emended description of P. oregonensis is provided. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
    -- Cited in Newsletter of the British Mycological Society (2001 Library additions); Mykoweb (pdf) (Desjardin 2001)
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Scott A Redhead. 2000.
    Stropharia albivelata and its basionym, Pholiota albivelata. Mycotaxon 76: 315-320.
    CONTENTS: The Northwest Forest Plan, which has designated 234 fungal species as important to Northern Spotted Owl forest habitats, has classified Pholiota albivelata as a Strategy 1 Survey & Manage species. After documenting acanthocyte formation on its mycelium, the authors transfer the species to Stropharia. They also propose the name Stropharia earlei for a related species, Pholiota cubensis. (See also Projects: Northwest Forest Plan, Biodiversity)
  • Scott A Redhead, Joseph F Ammirati, Lorelei L Norvell, Michelle Seidl. 2000.
    Notes on western North American snowbank fungi. Mycotaxon 76: 321-328.
    CONTENTS: A common snowbank mushroom originally described by AH Smith as Lyophyllum montanum has been shown to lack the siderophilous granules characteristic of Lyophyllum. The authors transfer the species to Clitocybe as Clitocybe glacialis (non C. montana Harmaja). The synonymy of Hygrophorus angelesianus and Clitocybe mutabilis is confirmed by type studies. Neohygrophorus angelesianus is accepted as the correct name and the new combinations N. cokeri (= Clitocybe cokeri) and N. umbrino-purpurascens (= Clitocybe umbrino-purpurascens) are proposed. A key to Neohygrophorus is provided. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Redhead, Scott; Norvell, Lorelei. 2000.
    Here come really-common common names? [NAMA and MSA endorse a commission to make recommendations; "1st List" not expected for one to two years.] Mushroom, The Journal. 18(4): 5-8.
    CONTENTS: Both papers report on the Mycological Society of America (MSA) exploratory committee research on the feasibility of a Commission on Common Mushroom names. The committee of five successfully negotiated an intersociety agreement between MSA and the North American Mycological Association (NAMA). The rationale for a joint commission is presented with the mandate and recommendations for composition of a recommended seven-person committee. [NOTE: MSA and NAMA presidents appointed Commission members --Dreiler, Norvell, Redhead (elected Chairman by Committee members), Riner, Roger, Sundberg, Volk -- in September, 2000]. (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 2000.
    Practical Mycology in the Twenty-first Century. Inoculum 51(3): 50.
    ABSTRACT: Taxonomists emerging from sparkling molecular labs and ivy- covered halls clutching a mycology degree all too frequently find themselves ill-equipped to take the world by profitable storm. The limited number of mycological posts in universities, government and commercial labs need not stop the resourcefully dedicated, however. In the PNW, environmental monitoring needs mycologists, and those mycologists must be ready to get dirty, work outside clean labs in less than pristine habitats, and deal with hard-nosed loggers, commercial harvesters, sawmill owners, multiple government agencies, nature clubs, and politicians. Fungal surveys are now taking place in active logging areas, fresh cuts, precuts, dog-hair thickets, second growth and old growth. What does it take to apply knowledge of subtle bruising reactions and one-micron differences in spore diameter obtained from scattered foreign publications while straining to hear the tell-tale whine of a fully loaded logging truck rushing down muddy roads amid the roar of chainsaws and crashing trees as you inch toward the summit in 4-wheel drive with fogged up windows, crackling shortwave and beating windshield wipers struggling to clear heavy rain? Twenty inocybes, thirteen russulas, four hebelomas, two chanterelles, two lattes, and one phaeocollybia later, more data becomes available. Such is the life of contract mycology. (See also Projects: Northwest Forest Plan, Biodiversity)
  • Lorelei Norvell. 2000.
    The GSMNP-ATBI diaries. Inoculum 51(1): 14-15, Inoculum 51(2): 10, Inoculum 51(3): 72, Inoculum 51(4): 20, Inoculum 51(5): 47-49; Inoculum 51(6): 24-25. "Great Smokies project has a new coordinator" Mycophile 41(5): 11, 13. "Great Smoky Mountain National Park All-Taxa Biological Inventory Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (TWIG) 1999-2000 comprehensive report". On file at Discover Life in America website <www.discoverlife.org>
    CONTENTS: Reports covering work done by the Fungal Taxonomic Working Group (Norvell 1998-2000 TWIG Coordinator) as part of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park All-Taxa Biological Inventory. Included is coverage on continued collections by the "Asheville Volunteer Fungal Department", identification of previously collected specimens by volunteer expert taxonomists, names and activities of new volunteers, Tree Canopy Biodiversity Project (coordinated by Dr Harold Keller), and August selection of new Coordinator, Dr David Porter. The 1998-2000 64-page report includes a nomenclature update of macrobasidiomycetes. (See also Projects: Biodiversity)
  • Scott Redhead, Lorelei Norvell. 2000.
    (The Askus column) Bugged? Ask a Mycologist. Mushroom, The Journal. 18(2): 18-21.
    CONTENTS: Responding to letters on common names and name changes, the authors comment the importance of allowing nomenclature to follow the taxonomic discoveries uncovered by scientific research and explain why Collybia radicata is not a Collybia and Xerula furfuracea not X. radicata. "Actually we believe that the average mushroomer has enough intelligence to expect their scientists not to balk at using a scientific instrument [microscope] invented over 300 years ago, even if it DOES mean not immediately recognizing all species in the field." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
    -- Cited in Mushroom, The Journal (Lincoff, 2000)
  • Lorelei Norvell, Scott Redhead. 2000.
    (The Askus column) The contest is over and no one got them all right -- but we still have a winner! Mushroom, The Journal. 18(1): 23-26.
    CONTENTS: The authors announce Richard Aaron as the winner of the "Can you identify 43 mushroom species from 54 English names?" contest, provide the latinized Pukey Point Fall Foray Master List and discuss some of the taxonomic and nomenclatural ins and outs of species on the list. "For instance, none of our authors missed a chance to personalize the lowly stropharia semiglobata. In addition to the listed dung roundhead, dung psilocybe, and dung slimehead, this mushroom is called round stropharia, dung dome, hemispherical stropharia, and manure roundhead. Groups of Mushroomers reading aloud these common names might vaguely sound like The Society for Polite Swearing and Cussing." (See also Projects: Agaric Taxonomy and Nomenclature)
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Last updated on October 13, 2003