Home || Curriculum Vitae || Publications || Projects

 

Publications and Reports: 2001

Jump to:             2003 || 2002 || 2001 || 2000
  1999 || 1998 || 1997 || 1996 || 1995 || 1994 || 1993 || 1992 || 1991 || 1990
  1989 || 1988 || 1987 || 1986 || 1985 || 1984 || 1983      

 

An informal poll for MSA members: Should the type of Coprinus be changed?

An informal poll for NAMA members: Should the type of Coprinus be changed?

Mycological dispatches: 2001. Summaries of recent research papers on North American macrofungi, lichens, and slime molds.

 

  • Norvell, Lorelei L. 2001.
    An informal poll for MSA members: Should the type of Coprinus be changed? Inoculum 52(5):5
    An informal poll for NAMA members: Should the type of Coprinus be changed?. Mycophile 42(5): 1,4.
    CONTENTS: Both papers present a very brief overview of the nomenclatural history of Coprinus sensu lato, note the recent segregation of the genus into the genera Coprinus sensu stricto, Coprinopsis, Coprinellus, and Parasola, and address a recent proposal to change the type species of Coprinus from C. comatus to C. atramentariu. "Coprinus comatus, or the 'shaggy mane', is among the best-known Coprinus species, both commercially and among amateur/field mycologists. In the scientific literature, however, Coprinus cinereus is cited much more frequently. Now Coprinopsis cinerea, that species would again become Coprinus cinereus if the type of the genus were changed to C. atramentarius. Currently, there is considerable debate in both Europe and North America as to which solution is least harmful: changing the genus name of C. comatus, or changing the type of Coprinus. Although caught between 'a rock and a hard place', the IAPT Nomenclature Committee for Fungi must make recommendations one way or the other." Discussions surrounding nomenclatural issues including the on-going nomenclatural debate over the type of Coprinus on other fungi can be viewed at the Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS). -- Cited in Mycologist (Moore, 2002). Complete article also posted on Mycovescence.
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2001 (2002).
    Mycological dispatches -- 2001. Summaries of recent research papers on North American macrofungi, lichens, and slime molds. McIlvainea 15(1): 23-28.
    CONTENTS: Summaries of 48 recent taxonomic, biological, or ecological research papers are provided to aid mushroomers and other mycologists who lack access to the technical literature. The author notes new species and combinations representing agaricoid (Agaricus, Clitocybe, Collybia, Coprinellus, Coprinus, Cortinarius, Crepidotus, Dendrocollybia, Flammulina, Galerina, Gomphidius, Hygrocybe, Inocybe, Lactarius, Lepiota, Leucoagaricus, Lyophyllum, Mycena, Neohygrophorus, Panellus, Pholiota, Pleurotus, Psathyrella, Rhacophyllus, Russula, Stropharia, Suillus), non-gilled Basidiomycete (Aleurodiscus, Arcangeliella, Battarrea, Cystangium, Disciseda, Elasmomyces, Gautieria, Gymnomyces, Macowanites, Martellia, Ramaria, Rhizopogon, Zelleromyces), hypogeous (Fevansia, Gastroboletus, Gastrosuillus, Gymnomyces, Hydnotrya, Rhizopogon, Tuber), and Ascomycete (Cordyceps, Daldinia, Hypoxylon, Peziza, Plicaria, Xylaria) genera. Erection of the new genus, Dendrocollybia, is noted. Phylogenetic analyses of many genera and fungal families are also summarized, and theories about the evolution of lichens is presented. Also discussed on papers pertaining to "Dispersal, Distribution & Ecology" and "Home Brews" (including the "Growth rate of fungi in bathrooms"). [The original manuscript, which could not be published in total in a hard-print publication and summarizes 144 papers and references another 110 papers, is posted here: PDF. Adobe Acrobat Reader required. ]
^top

All content copyright © 2000-2004 Pacific Northwest Mycology Service, LLC.

Last updated on October 13, 2003