Home || Curriculum Vitae || Publications || Projects

 

Publications and Reports: 2002

Jump to:             2003 || 2002 || 2001 || 2000
  1999 || 1998 || 1997 || 1996 || 1995 || 1994 || 1993 || 1992 || 1991 || 1990
  1989 || 1988 || 1987 || 1986 || 1985 || 1984 || 1983      

 

Oregon Natural Heritage rare and endangered fungal species (51 gilled and non-gilled Basidiomycetes).

ORCA 2000-2003 Macrofungal Inventory: Macrofungi of the Oregon Cave National Monument: 2000 Interim Report.

547 - The Douglas-fir epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete community in the western North American Northern Spotted Owl zone.

Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Years 2 (1999-2000) & 3 (2000-2001).

Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Year 4 (2001-2002).

Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities ­ the Green Peak density management study: Year 2 (1999-2000) & Year 3 (2000-2001).

Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities ­ the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Year 4 (2001-2002).

(1537­1538) Proposals to conserve the names Cantharellus lutescens Fr. : Fr. and C. tubaeformis Fr. : Fr. (Basidiomycota) with conserved types.

"Fungi" in Macmillan Science Library: Biology, Vol. 4.

The epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Douglas-fir fungal community in "peace" and "war".

Phaeocollybia in Western North America 3: New species P. phaeogaleroides and P. rifflipes, with notes on the P. festiva complex.

 

  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2002 (December 6).
    Oregon Natural Heritage rare and endangered fungal species (51 gilled and non-gilled Basidiomycetes). (Database on file at the Oregon Natural Heritage Information Center, Portland, Oregon, and on Natureserve, Washington, DC). 612 database fields, 143 pp summary.
    CONTENTS: Contains concept and name references plus other important literature citations, summaries from collections obtained from herbarium databases and data provided by the federal Northwest Forest Plan, synonymies, number of historical and current occurrences, data on population size, range, occupancy, short- and long-term trends, threats, protection status, and other important data used to rank the rare or threatened status of 51 fungal species in California, Oregon, Washington, and worldwide. Species evaluated were Acanthophysium farlowii, Albatrellus avellaneus, Al. caeruleoporus, Al. ellisii, Al. flettii, Baeospora myriadophylla, Bondarzewia mesenterica, Bridgeoporus nobilissimus, Chrysomphalina grossula, Chroogomphus loculatus, Clitocybe senilis, Collybia bakerensis, Cortinarius boulderensis, Cor. cyanites, Cor. humboldtensis, Cor. olympianus, Cor. umidicola, Craterellus 'tubaeformis' (nom. nov. in preparation), Dendrocollybia (<— Collybia) racemosa, Dichostereum boreale, Fayodia bisphaerigera / Mycena rainierensis, Galerina atkinsoniana, Gal. cerina, Gal. heterocystis, Gal. sphagnicola, Gomphus bonarii, Gom. clavatus, Gom. kauffmanii, Gymnopilus punctifolius, Hebeloma olympianum, Mythicomyces corneipes, Neolentinus adhaerens, N. kauffmanii, Phaeocollybia attenuata, californica, Ph. dissiliens, Ph. fallax, Ph. gregaria, Ph. kauffmanii, Ph. olivacea, Ph. oregonensis, Ph. piceae, Ph. pseudofestiva, Ph. scatesiae, Ph. sipei, Ph. spadicea, Polyozellus multiplex, Russula mustelina, Stagnicola perplexa, Stropharia (<— Pholiota) albovelata, and Tricholoma venenatum.
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2002 (August 15).
    ORCA 2000-2003 Macrofungal Inventory: Macrofungi of the Oregon Cave National Monument: 2000 Interim Report. (Unpublished report on file, USDI-NPS ORCA headquarters, Cave Junction, OR). 19 pp with 13 photos.
    CONTENTS: An inventory of the macrofungi found in the 480-acre national monument was initiated during the autumn mushroom fruiting season at the request of Natural Resources Specialist John Roth. A list of the 2000-2001 collections provisionally identified to 69 species and 42 genera is accompanied by inventory guidelines, sample description forms and labels, and 13 color photographs.
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Ronald L Exeter. 2002.
    547 - The Douglas-fir epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete community in the western North American Northern Spotted Owl zone. IMC7 Book of abstracts. Oslo. pp. 166-67.
    ABSTRACT: A joint private / USA government research team is tracking fungal species richness in montane Oregon Douglas-fir forests in two different 1998-2003 studies. Target species include all 'epi-ecto' basidiomycetes + 40 other non-ecto species flagged in the US federal Northwest Forest Plan. A chronosequence study incorporates replicate 200m2 permanent strip transects in 25-, 55-, and 150-year old stands sampled every 2 weeks during fall & spring fruiting seasons. The density management study comprises adjacent 65-year old stands thinned in 1999 following 5 different regimes: untreated (~450 trees/ha), thinned (3 stands with ~300, ~200, or ~100 residual trees/ha), or regeneration-cut (0 residual trees/ha). During the first 4 years, 280 (chrono) and 211 (density) target species have been identified from a total of 4,100 collections and 515 total (322 target) species. Agaricales comprise ~70%, Russulales ~20%, Gomphales ~5%, Boletales ~3%, and Cantharellales 1.5% of the target species total. Cortinariaceae comprise ~84% of the Agaricales; Cortinarius, Inocybe, Russula and Phaeocollybia represent the most species-rich target genera. After thinning, density study post / pre-treatment stand species richness ratios were significantly depressed only in the two most heavily thinned stands. Absence of modern PNW monographs has dictated frequent identification re-evaluation and led to development of temporary identification keys based on individual research papers and extralimital monographs. (See also Projects: BLM)
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Ronald L Exeter. 2002 (January 31).
    Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Years 2 (1999-2000) & 3 (2000-2001). Cost-share report on file at the USDI-BLM Salem District Office. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 70 pp.
    CONTENTS: The second interim report on the Oregon BLM funded research on epigeous basidiomycete species richness in different aged Douglas-fir stands presents a revised cumulative species list; tables and graphs comparing species richness in the 27-year old, 57-year old and 155-year old stands; photographs of 96 Cortinarius, Inocybe, Phaeocollybia, and Russula species; cross-referenced Cortinarius and Russula species indices; a list of all fungi collected by the team in this and the concurrently running Benton County density management study; and a list of all 1,538 collections representing 381 (249 target) species made from October 1998 through May 2001.
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2002 (September 15).
    Oregon’s Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Year 4 (2001-2002). Cost-share report on file at the USDI-BLM Salem District Office. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 25 pp.
    CONTENTS: Included in the third interim report are extensive taxonomic discussions of noteworthy species and species complexes and a list of the 535 collections representing 220 (160 target) species made during the fourth year. 60 new species were recorded for the project in 2001-2; 193 collections (129 species) were photographed macroscopically and 132 collections (98 species) microscopically.
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Ronald L Exeter. 2002 (January 31).
    Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Green Peak density management study: Year 2 (1999-2000) & Year 3 (2000-2001). Cost-share report on file at the USDI-BLM Salem District Office. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 72 pp.
    CONTENTS: The second interim report on the Oregon BLM funded research on the impact of forest thinning on epigeous basidiomycete species richness presents a revised cumulative species list; tables and graphs comparing (i) fungal composition in each of five stands undergoing different treatment regimes and (ii) species richness ratios before and after timber removal in treated and untreated stands; photographs of 50 Cortinarius, Inocybe, and Russula species; cross-referenced Cortinarius and Russula species indices; a list of all fungi collected by the team in this and the concurrently running Polk County chronosequence study; and a list of all 1,520 collections representing 318 (193 target) species made from October 1998 through May 2001.
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2002 (September 15).
    Oregon's Douglas-Fir ectomycorrhizal fungal communities - the Polk County Chronosequence Study: Year 4 (2001-2002). Cost-share report on file at the USDI-BLM Salem District Office. Pacific Northwest Mycology Service: Portland, Oregon. 18 pp.
    CONTENTS: Included in the third interim report are taxonomic discussions of noteworthy species and species complexes and a list of the 551 collections representing 192 (129 target) species made during the fourth year. 36 new species were recorded for the project in 2001-2; 203 collections (107 species) were photographed macroscopically and 137 collections (83 species) microscopically.
    ­­ Cited in Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • Scott A Redhead, Lorelei L Norvell, Eric Danell, Svengunnar Ryman. 2002.
    (1537­1538) Proposals to conserve the names Cantharellus lutescens Fr. : Fr. and C. tubaeformis Fr. : Fr. (Basidiomycota) with conserved types. Taxon 50: in press.
    CONTENTS: After recapitulating the often-tortured nomenclatural history surrounding the Latin names for two conspicuous edible European craterelles, the authors propose to bring an end to a 200-year long controversy by conserving the names for Cantharellus lutescens Fr. : Fr. (­> Craterellus lutescens (Fr. : Fr.) Fr.) and Cantharellus tubaeformis (­> Craterellus tubaeformis (Fr.) Quél.) with conserved types. They propose selecting the types from "two distributed exsiccati collections that unambiguously represent the two European species to which the epithets have been applied in the past 50+ years."
    ­­ Cited in BC NTFP Mushrooms (Gamiet et al. 2003); Ecology & Management of Commercially Harvested Chanterelles (Pilz et al. 2003).
  • L L Norvell. 2002.
    "Fungi" in Macmillan Science Library: Biology, Vol. 4. Richard Robinson, Editor. ISBN# 0-02-865551-6 (in press).
    CONTENTS: This encyclopedia entry covering the Union Fungi presents a short yet comprehensive overview of fungi including fungal nutrition and life strategies, ecological and economic importance and taxonomic classification, including important features delimiting the fungal phyla. "The Eumycota consist of eukaryotic, non-chlorophyllous heterotrophs that absorb nutrients from dead or living organic matter, have cell walls composed of chitin, and store excess energy as glycogen. The kingdom contains four phyla -- Chytridiomycota, Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota..."
  • Lorelei L Norvell, Ronald L Exeter. 2002.
    The epigeous ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Douglas-fir fungal community in "peace" and "war". Inoculum 53(3): in press.
    In 1998, our research team launched two concurrent 5-year species richness studies of Oregon Douglas-fir forest fungi. Target species included all "epi-ecto" + 40 flagged "epi-nonecto" basidiomycetes. In the Polk County chronosequence study, we sample permanent strip transects in 25yo, 55yo, and 150yo stands bi-weekly during the fall/spring fruiting seasons. The Benton County density management study comprises adjacent 65yo stands thinned in 1999 following 5 different regimes: untreated (~420 trees/ha), thinned (3 stands with ~300, ~200, or ~100 residual trees/ha), or regeneration-cut (0 residual trees/ha). Of 4,050 collections to date, 291 and 227 target species have been identified from the chrono and density studies respectively, of which ~70% are Agaricales, ~20% Russulales, ~5% Gomphales, ~3% Boletales, and ~1.5% Cantharellales. The Cortinariaceae comprise ~84% of the Agaricales, and Cortinarius, Inocybe, and Russula are the most species-rich target genera. In the density study's 2nd year after treatment, post/pre-treatment species richness ratios were significantly depressed in the heavily thinned stands yet surprisingly high in lightly thinned stands. Absence of adequate monographs has meant frequent re-evaluation of species identifications and led to development of identification keys based on individual research papers and extralimital monographs. (See also Projects: BLM)
  • Lorelei L Norvell. 2002.
    Phaeocollybia in Western North America 3: New species P. phaeogaleroides and P. rifflipes, with notes on the P. festiva complex. Mycotaxon 81: 95-112.
    ABSTRACT: Morphological and molecular reevaluation of the genus Phaeocollybia has uncovered the existence of two new forest agarics from British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California. Phaeocollybia phaeogaleroides produces small, fragile basidiomes with large, lightly ornamented, ellipsoid basidiospores, abundant clamp connections, and a unique fruiting phenology. First revealed during molecular analyses, Phaeocollybia rifflipes produces small basidiomes with tawny viscid pilei and lilac-colored lamellae. It shares affinities with two western species (Phaeocollybia fallax and Phaeocollybia lilacifolia) with glutinous pilei, lilac lamellae, vertical-monopodial pseudorhizae, limoniform basidiospores, and thin-walled clavate cheilocystidia. The close morphological relationship of three western species to the European Phaeocollybia festiva is discussed. (See also Projects: Phaeocollybia)
^top

All content copyright © 2000-2004 Pacific Northwest Mycology Service, LLC.

Last updated on October 13, 2003